Insights

The War in Yemen - The Unbeautiful South

Mohammed Albasha, Communication and Client Engagement Manager at Navanti Group, was interviewed by The Economist on the war in Yemen.

Learn More

For the first time, an alleged terrorist has broadcast a confession in real time on Facebook Live

John Arterbury, Project Manager at Navanti Group, was cited by Caitlin Dewey and Sarah Parnass of The Washington Post on live-streaming of terror attacks.

Learn More

Yemen in Focus: Allies turn rivals on strategic Socotra island

Mohammed Albasha, Communication and Client Engagement Manager at Navanti Group, was interviewed by the London-based ‘The New Arab’ on the crisis in Socotra Archipelago.

Learn More

Quiet Support for Saudis Entangles U.S. in Yemen

Mohammed Albasha, Communication and Client Engagement Manager at Navanti Group, was interviewed by By Mark Mazzetti and Eric Schmitt, The New York Times on the how the quiet support for Saudis entangles U.S. in Yemen.

Learn More

Foreign Aid Challenges in Yemen

Mohammed Albasha, Communication and Client Engagement Manager at Navanti Group, was interviewed by Le Monde on foreign aid challenges in Yemen.

Learn More

Could the Coronavirus Put an End to the War in Yemen?

“Could the Coronavirus Put an End to the War in Yemen?” by Charlotte Kamin, Arabian Peninsula analyst was originally published by Just Security.

Learn More

Radicals’ dominance in Idlib increases risk of tragedy

John Arterbury, Project Manager at Navanti Group, was interviewed by James Snell, The Arab Weekly on how the radical’s dominance in Idlib increases risk of tragedy.

Learn More

Syrian Rebels Are Using Snapchat to Sell and Show-Off Their Weapons

John Arterbury, Project Manager at Navanti Group, was interviewed by Ben Sullivan of VICE on the war in Syria and the usage of social media tools such as Snapchat.

Learn More

ISIS’ Scorched Earth: Visual Confirmation of Destruction in the Shaer Field

John Arterbury, Project Manager at Navanti Group, writes about the intricate local power dynamics surrounding the Sheer Field, Syria.

Learn More

The Yemen Exchange - An Intensive Online Course on Yemen

Mohammed Albasha, Communication and Client Engagement Manager at Navanti Group, spoke on the status and activities of non-state armed groups currently active in Yemen’s civil war at the fifth Yemen Exchange conference, hosted by the Sana’a Center for Strategic Studies, was held online between May 11-15, 2020.

Learn More

A New Yemen Model:

Mohammed Albasha, Communication and Client Engagement Manager at Navanti Group, spoke at AEI on the situation in Yemen.

Learn More

A Tree Grows in Karabakh

John Arterbury, Project Manager at Navanti Group, writes about the Nagorno-Karabakh Republic he visited. Once home to a patchwork of Armenians, Azeris, and nomadic Kurds, a vicious, ethnically driven war in the wake of the Soviet Union’s collapse technically leaves Azerbaijan in control; but in practice, the self-declared Nagorno-Karabakh Republic, is headed by Armenians.

Learn More

Middle East and North Africa Democratization Seminar

Mohammed Albasha, Communication and Client Engagement Manager at Navanti Group, spoke as a panelist for USMCU on Case Studies and Regional Perspectives.

Learn More

To destroy Islamic State, we must follow it into the desert

John Arterbury, Project Manager at Navanti Group, writes about how after Raqqa’s fall, the Islamic State retreated to Syria’s vast and overlooked Deir Ezzor province where it was already well entrenched. This arid stretch of eastern Syria straddling the Euphrates river valley had for too long failed to get the attention from policymakers it deserved.

Learn More

YEMEN'S BATTLEGROUND SHIFTS IN FAVOR OF IRAN-BACKED HOUTHIS

Mohammed Albasha, Communication and Client Engagement Manager at Navanti Group, was interviewed by the Wall Street Journal on recent military developments in Yemen. He stated that recent moves by the Saudi-led coalition were a sign that the “coalition is becoming more realistic and signaling that they’re going to pull back to where they have a better defensive line.” Mr. Albasha pointed to open-source satellite images that suggest Saudi Arabia was reducing its military footprint. Even if the Saudis continue to scale back, Mr. Albasha said, that won’t bring an end to the war between the Houthis and the Yemenis who remain opposed to their rule. “If this is the end of the Saudi intervention in the conflict, then war itself will likely continue for a long time,” he said. “The Houthis are unlikely to stop, as they want it all.”

Learn More